A Handbook for Independent School Change

When I learned that Denise Pope had published a new book (with Maureen Brown and Sarah Miles), I immediately thought that it would continue the story of Doing School, exposing the personal trials of high performing students in high performing schools. To my surprise, Overloaded and Underprepared reads more like a handbook for leading change to improve student well-being in high performing schools. It has immediately become an indispensable resource for schools that are engaged in change processes.

Pope, Brown and Miles stand with one foot in the world of education research and the other in practice, a welcome but uncommon place to be. Education research tends to be inaccessible or impractical to teachers, and teachers lack the time and structural imperative to stay abreast of education research. As a result, much school change happens without the benefit, or in opposition to, education research. Work that actively connects research to practice is therefore invaluable.

As Pope so clearly identified in Doing School, student compliance with school programming may mask severe stress and disengagement. When students meet school expectations, leaders and teachers may feel a general sense of satisfaction with the design of the school program. However, schools are complex organizations that rarely function at their potential in all areas!  High performing schools may unknowingly leave much student potential on the table. Pope et al help schools ask what they can do to keep improving. As the world never stops changing, schools that do not keep pace rapidly fall out of step with the needs of their students.

Overloaded and Underprepared focuses on the pressing issues facing high-performing independent and public schools: the process of school change, schedule, homework, engagement, assessment, Advanced Placement, social and emotional learning, communication, and professional development. Each chapter summarizes education research on that issue, describes school case studies from the authors’ consulting practice, and lists research references. A school practitioner may read a chapter, learn about schools making intentional changes, and find many references for further study. The book therefore serves a vital role in helping school leaders understand the issues that other schools are addressing and the research base that informs the accompanying changes.

While the opportunity gap facing urban and rural public schools has great national importance, dozens of research studies and books address that problem. Pope et al therefore fill a literature gap for independent schools. At the same time, independent and high performing public schools still face issues of social justice and educational equity, and Overloaded and Underprepared does little to address them. Do students of color receive an equally high quality experience as their white counterparts? What stresses do students of color and sexual minorities face every day? How does a school address issues of differential inclusion between majority and minority cultures within its walls? Does the school curriculum reflect mostly dominant culture perspectives, or do teachers teach multicultural and critical content across all subject areas? Pope et al miss an opportunity to address these questions in the book.

What other books inform the individuals and teams seeking to lead change in independent and high performing public schools? We regularly refer to the following.

Future Wise and Playing the Whole Game, two books by David Perkins

#EdJourney, by Grant Lichtman

Raising Race Questions, by Ali Michael

Loving Learning, by Tom Little and Katherine Ellison

What resources have you found most useful in your strategic planning work, particularly when designing new forms and supports for learning?

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