Tag Archive for diversity

Faculty Summer Reading 2019

Each summer, the UPrep faculty reads from a selection of books related to our strategic initiatives and professional growth areas. This year’s selections examine deeper learning, identity, and inclusion through research and memoir. Special thanks to Emily Schorr Lesnick and Veronica McGowan for selecting this year’s titles.

In Search of Deeper Learning

The Quest to Remake the American High School
Jal Mehta and Sarah Fine

book coverDrawing on hundreds of hours of observations and interviews at thirty different schools, Mehta and Fine reveal that deeper learning is more often the exception than the rule. And yet they find pockets of powerful learning at almost every school, often in electives and extracurriculars as well as in a few mold-breaking academic courses. These spaces achieve depth, the authors argue, because they emphasize purpose and choice, cultivate community, and draw on powerful traditions of apprenticeship. These outliers suggest that it is difficult but possible for schools and classrooms to achieve the integrations that support deep learning: rigor with joy, precision with play, mastery with identity and creativity. Harvard University Press

This book dives right into our ongoing work to bridge academic challenge and diversified ways of learning.

Whistling Vivaldi

How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do
Claude M. Steele

Claude M. Steele, who has been called “one of the few great social psychologists,” offers a vivid first-person account of the research that supports his groundbreaking conclusions on stereotypes and identity. He sheds new light on American social phenomena from racial and gender gaps in test scores to the belief in the superior athletic prowess of black men, and lays out a plan for mitigating these “stereotype threats” and reshaping American identities. W.W. Norton & Co.

While this book has been out for a while, it is an essential read for anyone who wants to understand the long-term and deeply-personal impacts that cultural inequality has on individuals, particularly with relation to achievement gaps in schools.

When They Call You a Terrorist

A Black Lives Matter Memoir
Patrisse Cullors and asha bandele

When They Call You a TerroristPatrisse Cullors’ first book cowritten by ashe bandele, is a poetic memoir and reflection on humanity. A New York Times Best Seller – necessary and timely, Patrisse’s story asks us to remember that protest in the interest of the most vulnerable comes from love. Leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement have been called terrorists, a threat to America. But in truth, they are loving women whose life experiences have led them to seek justice for those victimized by the powerful. In this meaningful, empowering account of survival, strength, and resilience, Patrisse Cullors and asha bandele seek to change the culture that declares innocent black life expendable. MacMillan

The memoir of Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors describes her childhood and family encounters with the criminal justice system, her experiences in schools, and her work to co-create the hashtag that has rocked the world.

Sissy

A Coming-of-Gender Story
Jacob Tobia

Sissy by Jacob TobiaFrom Jacob’s Methodist childhood and the hallowed halls of Duke University to the portrait-laden parlors of the White House, Sissy takes you on a gender odyssey you won’t soon forget. Writing with the fierce honesty, wildly irreverent humor, and wrenching vulnerability that have made them a media sensation, Jacob shatters the long-held notion that people are easily sortable into “men” and “women.” Sissy guarantees that you’ll never think about gender–both other people’s and your own–the same way again. Penguin Random House

The memoir of media sensation Jacob Tobia outlines their childhood experiences with gender and a path to gender healing.

Things That Make White People Uncomfortable

Michael Bennett and Dave Zirin

Michael Bennett adds his unmistakable voice to discussions of racism and police violence, Black athletes and their relationship to powerful institutions like the NCAA and the NFL, the role of protest in history, and the responsibilities of athletes as role models to speak out against injustice. Following in the footsteps of activist-athletes from Muhammad Ali to Colin Kaepernick, Bennett demonstrates his outspoken leadership both on and off the field.

Written with award-winning sportswriter and author Dave Zirin, Things that Make White People Uncomfortable is a sports book for our turbulent times, a memoir, and a manifesto as hilarious and engaging as it is illuminating. Haymarket Books

This book by former Seahawk Michael Bennett breaks down his perspective on race and racism, college and professional sports, and an athlete’s impact in the world.

 

Cultural Competency Through Literature

Current events demand that we teach students the skills and habits of mind of cultural competency. Development of a positive cultural identity, appreciation for other cultures, and the ability to move gracefully through a different culture are required in order to function within contemporary society. Our work to teach for cultural competency throughout the school began years ago and continues today. The school curriculum is one area of focus among many.

monkey king

Gene Luen Yang’s Monkey King

“List three groups to which you belong. What is the identity of each group?” With these prompts, sixth grade students begin to explore the concept of cultural identity. During the week, Carl Faucher and Eric Huff guide the students through an examination of Native American creation myths, the risks of cultural stereotypes, and the Chinese myth of the Monkey King. Connecting personal experiences to the study of literature helps students develop deeper understanding of these topics of cultural identity, stereotype, and conflict.

One week in October, ninth grade students read short stories by Langston Hughes, Audre Lorde, and N. Scott Momaday and worked together to analyze how the authors constructed their arguments and evoked emotions. While the Foundations of Composition and Literature course teaches critical reading and analytical writing, literature selections reflect a wide range of contemporary topics, including cultural experiences and transitions. The new 11th and 12th grade electives provide further opportunities to study how ideas of masculinity and femininity have shaped Western culture, how culture shapes our relationship with the environment, and how Americans understand their own identities through history and current media.

What About the Content? Revising Curricula for Cultural Competency

NAIS People of Color Conference 2014

Sarah Peterson and I will be presenting this session on Thursday, December 4 at 10:00am in Room 204. We look forward to seeing you there.

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What About the Content slides  (+ hi-res version)

Thursday morning, my colleague Sarah Peterson and I will present “What About the Content? Revising Curricula for Cultural Competency” at the NAIS People of Color Conference in Indianapolis. The presentation reflects several goals, and participants will play a major role. We hope that you will be able to attend or otherwise share your stories with us.
Focus on Curriculum Content
Why have we focused this study specifically on curriculum content? Substantial, excellent work exists on school climate, classroom environment, teacher qualifications, and student empowerment. Yet, the content that we teach students plays a central role in their education and speaks powerfully about what (and who) the school values.
Focus on Required Courses
A school’s course of study typically includes required and elective courses. Teaching for cultural competency can be more easily found in elective courses, where teachers have greater freedom in curriculum development. However, the students we most need to reach may avoid such classes, and our diverse student body deserves a culturally representative learning experience in their required courses. We have chosen to focus this study on the core curriculum, while acknowledging that it is the hardest to change.
Share Examples from University Prep
On the one hand, we can proudly point to teachers and courses that have made tremendous strides in teaching for cultural competency. On the other hand, our students tell us that we still have much ground to cover. We will share a number of examples in this presentation that reflect our ongoing work toward a truly representative, relevant, and empowering core curriculum.
Share Participant Experiences and Points of View
While we have a lot to say on this subject, we are by no means experts, and the collective experiences and perspectives in the conference hall will no doubt exceed ours. We will take advantage of this gathering of attendees and ask everyone to participate first in small group discussions and then share out selected examples with the whole group. As a result, the session will end having identified a substantial number of curricular innovations in the required courses in our school.